Get Plants – A New Book from Kew (Review)

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I was recently sent a review copy of ‘Get Plants – How to bring green into your life’ – the latest book from Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. I seem to have grown a fondness, bordering on obsession, with gardening-related books these days  so any chance of indulging this new habit is fine with me.

The book has been written by Katherine Price, a trained gardener who worked at Kew for 10 years specialising in alpine and woodland plants. She has also worked on four gold medal winning gardens at the Chelsea Flower Show. The introduction draws on research that suggest having plants around is not only imperative to our existence but also improves our mood, memory and positive energy as well as studies that show people who spend time with plants have better relationships – I think us plant lovers will largely agree that there are many beneficial effects of having greenery in our lives.

The book aims to give the back story to a large range of easy to acquire plants that are simple to grow and will fit in to the different areas of your home and outdoor spaces in pots and containers. Plants that will fit ‘your style’ and brighten your home and life and radiate more of that positive energy. It covers such a broad spectrum of plants that it should have much appeal as a generalist guide encouraging people to rethink their space and get that bit greener.

On initial flick through my first impression was ‘ooh, nice pictures’, it definitely has that coffee table look and appeal to it so I waited for a quiet night home alone so I could sneak upstairs early with a cup of tea and read it. There are a number of things I like about this book – the photography is lovely and as a keen, but very amateur, gardener I learnt a huge amount of things such as how to over-winter plants typically considered as annuals, how to take cuttings from a variety of plants as well as the origins of many plants. I had no idea until reading this book that it’s pelargoniums (and not geraniums) that you see all over the place in those iconic blue pots in Greece. It was also really interesting to read about NASA’s research with plants in preparation for our colonisation of the moon (still ongoing). They discovered that certain plants are particularly good at cleaning up our environments by removing toxins emitted by mass produced clothes, furniture and wall coverings. They also remove bioeffluents, mould spores and bacteria as well as refreshing our oxygen and raising indoor humidity which helps counter issues caused by dry air from central heating systems.

There are also ‘Kew Tips’ littered throughout the book and one I have to try suggests that the pots of growing herbs you buy from the supermarket can actually be split and propagated so that you can harvest them for months instead of days. There’s also an environmental awareness running throughout with information on peat-free compost and how to make your own, warnings on the provenance of plants, recycling and sharing of cuttings.

There were some things I found a bit frustrating – there are lovely quotes from Kew gardeners throughout the book, however, often there are no pictures of the plant that they are referencing on that page so I had to turn to google to look these plants up numerous times. The photographs aren’t labelled individually so you have to spend some time working out which is which from the notes and often they are quite generic descriptions such as ‘dahlias’ or ‘petunias’ without the specific type, which would have been nice to know. The real niggle for me was the language used in some of the chapter titles ‘Trashy’, ‘Romper Room’ and ‘Lurve’ which seemed discordant with the content and Kew Gardens. But maybe that’s just me with my overly-genteel sensibilities.

Despite my niggles, I thoroughly enjoyed reading Get Plants and it would make a nice gift, however, caveat emptor (buyer beware) this book will likely having you rushing out to your nearest nursery and spending a small fortune if you’re anything like me. I now ‘need’ an African Violet, Florist’s Cyclamen, Mother in Law’s Tongue, Hostas (all of them), Purple Aeonium, String of Beads, Blue Star Fern, Elephant’s Ear and a Hyacinth – told you! Not a bad shopping list from one book.

RRP £25 and it will be released on 1st July. Available here on Amazon

 

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