Tag Archives: Whitmuir Organic Farm

Homemade Food and Seed Swap

Yesterday afternoon we headed over to Whitmuir Community Farm to take part in a joint event between Whitmuir and  Food Communities.org where people were invited to visit the 2000m2 project at the farm and to bring homemade produce and seeds to swap with each other. I gingerly took my boxes of seeds out into the garden and shook the spiders out – thankfully I had LOADS to take (seeds not spiders)! Continue reading Homemade Food and Seed Swap

Homemade Food & Seed Swap Event at Whitmuir Farm – 25th Feb

We love going to Whitmuir Farm and this looks like a great event – not that we need an excuse to pop over – hopefully see a few of you there…

HOMEMADE FOOD & SEEDS SWAP, PICKLING & PRESERVING WORKSHOP, FREE HOT FOOD, AND A TOUR OF THE 2000M² PROJECT.

This FREE event has been organised by Food Communities & Whitmuir Community Farm. Everyone is very welcome to come along and you don’t have to bring something to swap, so please tell your friends! Bring your favourite homemade dishes, bakes, sweets, preserves etc and also any seeds to swap amongst the group.

We will meet in the 2000m² polytunnel at 4pm on Sunday 25th Feb for a tour of the 2000m² Project, showcasing the growing, composting and cooking activities that the project has been undertaking this year as part of its Food for a Better Climate project. At around 5pm we will go to the Whitmuir Organics Cafe where we will have our homemade food and seeds swap and a pickling and preserving workshop. Hot food will be provided free in the cafe by the 2000m² Project. The event will finish at around 6.30pm.

FAQs

What can I bring to swap at the event?

You can bring any homemade food you think will be of interest to other swappers (e.g. your best bread, tastiest soup, yummiest cake). This is an opportunity to showcase your cooking talents and try the food of other people in your community. We will also be swapping seeds.

Will we be eating the homemade food we swap at the event?

No. You should bring containers (e.g. tupperwares) to take your items home with you. We are not permitted to have homemade food consumed in the cafe.

How should I bring my homemade food to the event?

You should bring your food divided into small portions so that lots of people can sample it. Please also bring a printed list of ingredients to accompany your food in the interest of other swappers with dietary requirements.

Is there anything else I should bring with me?

If you can, it would be good to bring one or two empty and clean glass jars for the pickling and preserving workshop. Don’t worry if you don’t have any handy though, as there will be spares available.

Are there ID or minimum age requirements to enter the event?

This is family friendly event however we would ask that any child under the age of 16 is accompanied by an adult as this is a working farm.

What are my transport/parking options for getting to and from the event?

There is no public transport to the event but we would encourage car sharing. Please get in touch if you would like to provide or accept a lift.

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/homemade-food-seeds-swap-tickets-41417819814?aff=es2

Getting Our Hands Dirty – Foraging and Soil Science

This week the Gastronomy MSc kicked off properly and Monday was a brilliant day – we were looking at Food Procurement – a brief history and consideration of the methods and location from which we acquire our food and how this shapes our relationship with the environment.

Foraging with Fi Martynoga
Foraging with Fi Martynoga

This included a guest lecture and foraging session with food historian and author Fi Martynoga. amazingly we found so many wild edibles within the campus environs – yarrow, hogweed, vetch, chamomile, brambles, rosehips, elderberries, barberries, beech nuts, hazelnuts, ground elder and also some leftover oats and barley – probably from a time when the land was farmed.

Tuesday began with a session in the campus allotment, it’s been a little neglected over the past year so our job will be to take it on and sort it out over the coming months. First, we got our hands dirty by examining the soil, looking for worms and testing the PH to see what we’ve got to play with.

Getting to grips with our campus allotments
Getting to grips with our campus allotments

This was followed by a lecture on understanding soil – love this quote “understanding soil isn’t rocket science, it’s far more complicated” Mark Kibblethwaite.

We also had a guest lecture from Dr Kenneth Loades from the James Hutton Institute who gave us a fascinating insight into Scottish soils, agriculture, root systems, erosion, the yield gap and other issues for soil and ultimately our food and drink supply.

Green Manure Seeds
Green Manure Seeds

We took a brief look at urban agriculture as well. So far so good, this is going to be one very interesting course. Off the back of this we discovered that Whitmuir Organic Farm, just along the road, is running a series of participative workshops with scientists, farmers, politicians and other interested parties over the coming months – I’ve applied to be part of this, couldn’t be more relevant so fingers crossed. More info here

On of my fellow cohorts, who also has a particular interest in gardening, kindly gave me some ‘Green Manure Seeds’ to try out as a soil improver through the Winter. I’ve got Red Clover, Winter Tares & Italian Ryegrass – the idea is to plant them now let them grow and in the Spring cut them back, cover with a good layer of compost/manure and sow our next lot of crops in much enriched soil. Really looking forward to seeing how they work!